Monthly Archives: June 2016

New Economics Lecture series

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mcd new economics lecture tours

Having reviewed a few of the New Economics lectures, WMNEG’s Ann Wackett draws attention to this series which might be a useful way to access Labour’s emerging economic policy, albeit as part of a wider suite of economic approaches, given that WMNEG is non partisan vis party politics.

The Shadow Chancellor, John McDonnell, has convened this series of public events to broaden the debate around economics in Britain. A range of experts have been presenting their views at a number of events across the country, with questions from members of the public.

john mcdonnell smallAll participants speak for themselves, rather than for the Labour Party or the Shadow Chancellor.

Nevertheless, John McDonnell and his team hope that the themes which emerge will help to inform conversations about economic policy across the board.

Please check back as further events will be added in due course.

http://www.labour.org.uk/blog/entry/the-new-economics

 

 

 

 

 

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UBI: WMNEG member Jeremy Heighway writes from Leipzig

Conference: Universal Basic Income Network in Hamburg

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Pathways of thought: common and uncommon ground, aims and direction when it comes to the environmentJeremy Heighway

Looking at the aims of the conference page, it says very clearly: “A basic income is therefore a route to a degrowth society, however, a basic income does not necessarily start the ecological transformation that is so urgently needed,” and continues, “… addressing this … needs to be thoroughly incorporated into any implementation of a basic income and its accompanying measures.”

The tracks appear to go cold right there, however, as a shift is made towards four other areas of discussion, none of which intrinsically address ecological transformation. It is perfectly possible for a supporter of a basic income to ignore ecological transformation; to some extent it is even possible to be in favour of increased consumption.

The degrowth movement is a mindset; the basic income is a mechanism. This provides a possible clash from the outset, based on the question of what you hope to achieve and how.

On the societal side I think there is quite a good overlap and it is a great idea to get the movements working together. But opportunities can be missed if two groups do not also look hard at what is not automatically going to be addressed if you work together.

One huge area is, as stated above, ecological transformation. My proposal looks at eco-taxation and suggests that all increased revenue be returned to everyone evenly in the form of a basic income. However, I do not believe it would be able to help finance the true basic living-cost foundation much. It is certainly much more of an easy attachment to a basic income than a direct source of finance. Strangely, it is almost something which degrowth supporters need to be vigorous about from an environmental benefit perspective and argue for with basic income supporters.

The semi-sideline nature is maybe one reason why basic income supporters have not been very supportive of this idea so far: if it doesn’t do much to actually finance the true basic income, why complicate matters and potentially alienate people along the way with an unpopular taxation device?

Now it’s your time dear degrowth supporters: why do environmental concerns need to be considered again? And, dear basic income supporters, you can actually gain some firm supporters and new friends if you take up this idea – “… addressing this … needs to be thoroughly incorporated into any implementation of a basic income and its accompanying measures”, remember these stated aims of the conference?

Jeremy Heighway currently lives in Leipzig, was an active participant at the degrowth conference in 2014, and took part in the basic income GAP sessions. He also wrote a stirring paper on infrastructures for a parallel GAP. In his day job, Jeremy mostly does translations from German to English in the field of renewable energy.