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Uplands allotments/leisure gardens Handsworth: 29th June

Malcolm Currie will speak about Uplands – described as idyllic, on the edge of the city and bordering “the lungs of Birmingham” (Sandwell Valley Country Park.)

The Meetup website explains that the aim is to facilitate food production, support education about growing in an urban setting as well as foster small, local businesses.

In addition to regular weekly, occasional and annual activities, current projects include rainwater harvesting, a community bread/pizza oven (help urgently sought!), renewable energy, a bore hole for water, as well as micro businesses.

Future developments could include a warden’s residence, therapeutic community gardens, children’s fantasy gardens, herb, spice and fruit trails, viewpoints with specifically designed seating (possibly as a part of a recovery journey) and a pond dipping site.

For a more formal account of Uplands click here

WMNEG mailing list will receive details soon & OB will host its entry in the Brummie aggregator.

 

 

 

 

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2. Green Economics: An Introduction to Theory, Policy and Practice 2009, by Molly Scott Cato

Matters to which local authorities ‘must have regard’ when drawing up their sustainable community strategy:

(a) the provision of local services

(b) the extent to which the volume and value of goods and services that are sold or procured by public bodies are produced within 30 miles of the boundary of the public body

(c) the rate of increase in the growth and marketing of organic forms of food production and the local food economy

(d) measures to promote reasonable access by all local people to a supply of food that is adequate in terms of both amount and nutritional value,

(e) the number of local jobs

(f) measures to conserve energy and increase the quantity of energy supplies which are produced from sustainable sources within a 30 mile radius of the region in which they are consumed

(g) measures taken to reduce the level of road traffic including, but not restricted to, local public transport provision, measures to promote walking and cycling and measures to decrease the amount of product miles

(h) the increase in social inclusion, including an increase in involvement in local democracy

(i) measures to increase mutual aid and other community projects

(j) measures designed to decrease emissions of greenhouse gases

(k) measures designed to increase community health and well being

(l) planning policies which would assist with the purposes of this Act including new arrangements for the provision of affordable housing

(m) measures to increase the use of local waste materials for the benefit of the community.

According to Richard Douthwaite, the four basic steps towards greater local self-reliance are:

  • Setting up an independent currency system so that the economy can still function no matter what happens in the global financial system;
  • The establishment of an independent banking system, such as a credit union, again to protect the local economy from international financial pressures;
  • The production of enough energy to meet the needs of the local economy;
  • Meeting people’s need for food and clothing from within the local economy.

The campaign for localisation has made most headway in the area of food—unsurprising given that this is our most basic need. The objective is not for self-sufficiency but for self-reliance. A system of farming that was truly designed to feed people and to go on doing so for the indefinite future, would be founded primarily on mixed farms and local production. In general, each country . . . would contrive to be self-reliant in food. Self-reliant does not mean self-sufficient. . . Self-reliance does mean, however, that each country would produce its own basic foods, and be able to get by in a crisis.

Essential Features of a Sustainable Territory

  • It has a stable population
  • It provides the basic necessities of life for its population from renewable resources under its control and expects to be able to continue to do so without over-using or degrading those resources for at least a thousand year
  • It is therefore able to trade with the outside world of choice rather than necessity
  • It is able to protect is renewable resources and its population both militarily and economically
  • Its collection of economic protection weapons includes an independent currency and banking system
  • It has no debts to lenders outside and there are no net flows of capital across its borders
  • It does not depend on continual economic growth to stave off collapse. Its economy grows very slowly if at all.

Source: Adapted from Douthwaite, 2004